A cyberpunk police car by Giannis Milonogiannis whose Old City Blues police cyberpunk adventure comics may be viewed for free online.

A cyberpunk police car by Giannis Milonogiannis whose Old City Blues police cyberpunk adventure comics may be viewed for free online.

Asker Avatar
Anonymous asked:
Your post makes things a lot clearer. Bioshock is hard to understand. But one question. At the end, we saw that there was only one Elizabeth when booker died and he was sent back to his office, and by killing Elizabeth, there is still one in rapture...? I don't know.

The ending of Infinite fades to black before we see whether the last Elizabeth fades away like the others. If Booker dies before the baptism, she should’ve faded away b/c he theoretically died before she had been born. But I’m guessing she didn’t fade b/c we have two new realities as a result of his death, one in which he was drowned and another new reality in which he wasn’t drowned and Elizabeth was born. If you have a reality in which he wasn’t drowned then you have the same two realities that exist in which Booker did and did not accept the baptism. It’s impossible to kill anyone or change future evemts when there are alternate realities for every action. Plus, I don’t believe we’re seeing the Rapture from the first game. There was a voxophone by Suchong in which he was complaining about Finck stealing his intellectual property. It’s a different Rapture from an alternate universe. Just a theory.

Burial at Sea Ending

** Spoilers **

Okay, I have a theory about the ending. We learned at the end of Bioshock Infinite that two realities sprang from Booker’s baptism, one in which he went through with it and became Comstock and another reality in which he didn’t go through with it to become the Booker we played in the game. My theory is that their solution to rid the universe of Comstock by killing Booker before the baptism was flawed b/c the act of killing Booker also sprang two realities, one in which Booker was drowned as we saw in the finale to Infinite and one in which he wasn’t drowned at all.

In a world of multiple universes, it’s impossible to eliminate Comstock. Hence the ending to Burial at Sea.

"Upside Down" matte painting by Wardenlight Studios.

"Upside Down" matte painting by Wardenlight Studios.

"Upside Down" matte paintings by Wardenlight Studios.

Concept art for Wolfenstein: The New Order.

"Ruined Fortress" by Jadrien Cousens.

"Ruined Fortress" by Jadrien Cousens.

"City Futurist" by Nicolas Zuriaga.

"City Futurist" by Nicolas Zuriaga.

by Bo Li.

by Bo Li.

Asker Avatar
Anonymous asked:
Thanks for Posting my work. Scott Richard

Thank you! I love your work. 

Concept art by Robh Ruppel for Uncharted 3.

First, above is a beautiful tribute to Bioshock Infinite that incorporated a number of early demos and cutscenes that did not make it into the final production. Very interesting.

Second, I’ve played this visually sumptuous game twice, and I have some thoughts about the story that might be worth sharing.

Ken Levine and his creative team took quantum physics and, I think, turned it into a story about the consequences of poor choices. See that bad guy you hate so much? Make enough poor choices in life and you could become just… like… him.
 
I have a theory that most, if not all, of the enemies you face throughout the game are reflections of Booker Dewitt. Take, for example, the Handymen. These are guys who chose to have their bodies transformed into a mostly mechanized figure in order to live forever but that choice brought them great pain. When you fight them, you can hear them say things like, “Every step is like burning coal!” “Stop making so much noise!” “Do you want to be like me?” Essentially, these are men who made an extreme choice that put them into predicaments of great pain… just like Booker’s own past decisions.
 
Comstock is an obvious reflection of Booker for reasons that are revealed at the end of the game. Daisy Fitzroy and the extremes she takes in her Vox Populi revolution, particularly when she tried to murder that child, mirror the extremes Dewitt had taken in his past during the Battle at Wounded Knee, which earned him the nickname “The White Injun.”
 
In fact, Booker’s whole life could be characterized by extremes. There were the extremes he went to after his baptism in both realities. The extremes he took at the Battle of Wounded Knee. The extreme and poor choice he made about Anna to solve a problem. There were also the extremes he took in his grief when his wife died in which he drowned himself in alcohol and gambling that got him into this jam in the first place.
 
I suspect that what we are seeing in Columbia are two fighting factions that reflect extreme aspects of Booker’s personality. When those extremes duel it out, his whole world, both Columbia and New York City, burns.

goadthings:

Star Trek original series matte paintings.